North by Northwest Discussion Questions

 Please post your responses to the following questions on the class message board.

  1. Research the double dissolve in North by Northwest online.  Is it justly celebrated. Can you find another example of tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest?
  2. The cornfield sequence has been praised by numerous critics for its complex construction. Is there another sequence in the film that strikes you as a sophisticated construction?

 

 

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83 Responses to “North by Northwest Discussion Questions”

  1. Raven Ferullo Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in “North by Northwest” was quite justly celebrated in its time. Even today, the use of this technique helps to get the message across of a passage of time. The technique kind of kills two birds with one stone by replacing the more antiquated version of this process, where a special slide was shown with words like “two hours later” or “meanwhile back at headquarters” and so on. This technique also added a nice touch to it by making a much nicer, less choppy transition while still showing this time passage through scenery changes.This particular film really embraced montage because of the use of double dissolve, one minute your on a train the next you’re at the station. One specific tour-de-force montage that stuck out to me and was also mentioned while I was doing my research was at the very end when Roger and Eve were hanging off the mountain and then were suddenly in the train all within what appeared to be the same scene without using a dissolve really. The very last fight scene on the mountain also used a lot of montage by the way constantly moved back and forth between Roger and Eve and “the bad guys.” It would switch between both groups and each switch showed them in different positions and climbing onto different rocks, because of this it appeared more choppy and spliced together like montage.

    2. Another specific sequence in the film that struck me as complex was the very last fight scene on the mountain. This scene stuck out to me because of the angles and all the action that ensued. Just capturing the movement on the rocks and moving between both groups of people appeared difficult. THe camera was angled at all different viewpoints too, close up, looking down, far away, and higher up. To me, because of all these different shots, the scene itself must have taken a long time to film and a lot of premeditation.

  2. Marielle Pezzella Says:

    1. When I first started researching the double dissolve online, I was wondering what the big deal was about one scene dissolving into the next. It’s something that you see all the time in modern movies. However, when I realized what exactly was going on in the scenes, I really came to appreciate the genius of the double dissolve. Alfred Hitchcock lets us know the new setting and time with a single, seamless transition that flows with story. I think that this great feat is justly celebrated for its ingenuity and efficiency. Hitchcock also used another great example of tour de force montage when Eve and Roger are on the Mt. Rushmore monument. Eve is clutching to the side of the monument and is reaching towards Roger’s hand, when he unexpectedly pulls her onto a bed in a train, calling her Mrs. Thornhill. In that quick transition, we are informed that time has passed and Roger and Eve were married. This is probably the most obvious example of tour de force montage in North by Northwest, but rightly so. The transition really stands out to the audience and takes a moment to understand, but is very cool once you realize what had happened.

    2. The cornfield scene may have been praised by critics for its complexity, but I believe that there is a sequence with a far more sophisticated construction. Near the end of the movie, there is a sequence that takes place in a forest on top of Mt. Rushmore. I thought the forest had a complex structure, but that was before the action took the characters down the faces of the men on Mt. Rushmore. Mt. Rushmore was far more sophisticated than the forest. The sequence on the monument must have been extremely complex to compose using the set, the camera angles, and the action. The camera bounced back and forth from showing the enemies and Roger and Eve. This alone must have taken a great deal of time, let alone the many hours spent building the set and arranging dramatic camera angles. I found this scene much more worthy of critics’ praise than the cornfield.

  3. Adrienne Gerzeny Says:

    1. One of the most famous double dissolves in North by Northwest takes place after Townsend is stabbed and killed at the United Nations in New York. Thornhill runs away and is now a fugitive from the police. The double dissolve goes from that scene to one that is explained as the headquarters of the United States Intelligence Agency. Through images, we know that some time has elapsed. We also know that Thornhill has been identified as the suspected murderer. Police are looking for him, but he has so far avoided capture. The images further convey that he is falsely accused as the murderer. His true identity is that of a New York advertising man who is now a fugitive because of mistaken identity. The professor at the USIA explains that Kaplan, the guy that the criminals are looking for, is a decoy and doesn’t exist. He was created to throw the evil vandamm off the real government agent. The USIA gives up on Thornhill, deciding that if he is killed, there is nothing they can do about it. Another rather lengthy montage is the sequence of Thornhill’s drunk driving along a narrow section of road near the ocean. After nearly going over a cliff, Thornhill weaves sleepily and drunkenly down the road, barely missing other cars and trees. At one point, he narrowly misses a bicyclist. It appears that this scene was partially shot in a studio using rear projection.

    2. The final sequence in the film, which supposedly takes place on the face of Mount Rushmore, evidently involved some very sophisticated construction. The reason is that the director, Alfred Hitchcock, was not given permission to film at the real monument. Instead, his crew was forced to construct a mock up of Mount Rushmore for the filming. In any case, the action and the movements on the faces of the presidents seemed realistic. One character falls to his death. Miss Kendall nearly falls to hers, and Thornhill pulls her up, barely in time to save her. The sequence was shot with some kind of filter to make it look like night time, which may have covered up any flaws in the scenes. Still, this final scene was very clever and believable.

  4. Tucker Taylor Says:

    1. The double dissolve used in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. This intricate placing of scenes gives the storyline a basis in which to add on to. It brings in new characters into the plot line and adds a twist to it as well. In all, the addition of the montage was beneficial to the storyline, thus it is worthy of celebration. Another montage found in North by Northwest which i believe was tour-de-force was the scene after they got off the train. The montage found there showed the audience that she was associated with the antagonist while still adding in humor so as to hold the attention of “young people”.

    2. A sequence in the film that strikes me as a sophisticated construction was the Mt. Rushmore scene. Life-size replicas on which the actors were to climb and fight pulled me to the edge of my seat. In addition to the awe-inspiring set were the special effects added to create a mile high environment in which the actors could perform without actually risking their lives. While I still believe that the cornfield scene was the best constructed, I still believe that this one deserves praise of anyone who sees it.

  5. Benjamin Sweeney Says:

    1. A seemingly simple technique, the double dissolve used in “North by Northwest” really surprised me the more I looked into it. What can appear a sequence of meaningless visuals can actually give the audience key information to better understand and enjoy the plotline of the film. For example, a double dissolve can be used to show a passage of time in mere seconds. They used this effect in the film by dissolving to newspaper clippings that showed a progression of events, and; therefore, a progression in time. I do agree with the celebration of this technique for were it not for the use of this ingenious transition, Hitchcock would have been forced to show a lapse in both time and setting in an entirely different and less efficient manner. Another example in the movie is when Roger is pulling Eve up from Mount Rushmore when the scene fades to Roger pulling Eve onto a bed in a train that the two had spoken about riding earlier. What makes this scene a tour-de-force montage is how we know time has passed by what we see and hear (Roger calls her Mrs. Thornhill) rather than the film using another 10 or 15 minutes of film to get across the same message.

    2. After seeing what must’ve gone into constructing and filming the sequence at the cornfield, it was hard to see any sets that could possibly be more complex. There were; however, some other sets that did surprise me and clearly took some engineering prowess. For one, the mountainside home owned by Vandamm was a beautiful piece of work and, if they created that set, it must have taken a copious amount of time to design and build. Far exceeding that, furthermore, was the sequence of the film that took place on Mount Rushmore. Aside filming on the actual landmark, I can’t see how Hitchcock could have improved the nail-biting, climactic scene that he produced using constructed sets and visual effects. The sophistication of the life-sized rocks and sculptures, along with the fairly realistic falling scenes, created the ultimate finale to the film, and, to me, far surpassed the cornfield sequence in visual splendor.

  6. Robert Shannahan Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest is a genius way of implementing certain statistics in one shot. In this case it was the newspaper that gave us decent information about the murder. Revealing the time, place, and that the murderer is not caught. The cool part about this technique is that it only had to be one shot to give out so much information. Is it justly celebrated? Well yes, in a way that people thank this movie for coming up with an idea so brilliant that multiple movies can use it today. Another example of the tour-de-force in this movie would include the scene when they stuff Cary Grant into the car and then he appears somewhere in the forest and they let him out of the truck. Using a time-lapse which took him somewhere else. Which was beyond imaginable when this movie came out in 1959.

    2. The cornfield scene which had to go back and forth from Cary to the plane every few minutes was shockingly complex. Since, they had to know where Cary was in the cornfield at the same time being able to come down from the plane and to seek out Cary in a cornfield. Which to me seems like some fine camera work. Also, the construction and placement of everything must have taken them a very long time as well. Especially when the plane ran into the truck creating an explosion which must have taken them forever to create. Another sequence in the film that strikes me as complex is when Cary decided to eavesdrop on the murderers plot towards the end of the film. Showing the construction of the house and the runway structure which was ridiculously complex, I would imagine to make.

  7. Nick DeJoy Says:

    1. The double dissolve is the object being replaced by another object which is then replaced by another object with glimpses of all three in one “swipe.” It is fairly celebrated because it was one of the earliest of its time. An example of a tour-de-force montage is when Roger and Eve were escaping with the art sculpture down the side of Mount Rushmore. The way the camera angles viewed many different parts of the Mountain was very unique and showed who they were running from and where they were running to.

    2. I also thought the cornfield scene with the one road was well constructed with the plane exploding into the truck and the real-looking corn stalks. Another sequence that struck me a sophisticated construction is again the Mount Rushmore scene. When they were climbing down and throughout the Mountain the features on the faces were very spectacular.

  8. Justin French Says:

    1) I feel like the double dissolve used in “North by Northwest” is justly celebrated since it helped give the feeling that there was a rapid change of events as well as show very important information. The transition to a newspaper heading showed that Roger Thornhill was not captured leaving the UN building after being framed for the murder of a high ranking UN official without showing a long escape scene. A very practical reason to use double dissolve would be to cut the time of a seemingly long movie already. Another ingenious transition that was used in “North by Northwest” was the transition from the couple hanging from Mount Rushmore to traveling the train which probably saved at least 20 extra minutes of film that would not have been interesting.

    2) The chase scene on Mount Rushmore while Roger Thornhill and Eve Kendall are climbing down monuments seems to be a very elaborately constructed scene. Since they were obviously unable to use the actual monument, there had to be very elaborate and large scale replica of Mount Rushmore which probably took weeks if not months to build. In my opinion, the hard work payed off, creating a very complex and praise-worthy scene.

  9. Lindsey Dasher Says:

    1. I believe that the double dissolve technique is justly celebrated. It’s a great way of showing the passage of time without being too obvious and saying something like “One year later”. I feel like another example of a tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest would be the scene at the end where Roger Thornhill is pulling Eve Kendall up from the cliff on Mount Rushmore after their attacker had been shot, and it immediately flashes to him pulling her up on a train bed. We know that time has passed because he calls her Mrs. Thornhill, indicating that she is now his wife. The filmmaker could have written in another scene where they were getting engaged or married, but that would have wasted time and this was an effective to show how time has passed.

    2. While no sequence is as complex as the cornfield sequence, I believe that the scene at the end where Roger and Eve are being chased on Mount Rushmore is sophisticated enough to compare to it. In both scenes, someone is being chased and there is a lengthy process of finding a way out. In the cornfield sequence, Roger has to resort to hiding in the corn and, after the plane crashes, he steals a spectator’s car. In the Mount Rushmore scene, someone ends up luckily shooting the attacker when he starts to step on Roger’s hand. Roger’s hand holding on to the cliff is the only thing keeping him and Eve alive. If the attacker had not been shot, there is a good possibility that Roger and Eve would be dead. because he could have broken Roger’s hand forcing him to let go of the cliff. The filmmaker obviously did not come up with either of these sequences easily.

  10. Rachel Swain Says:

    1. All of the things that I found didn’t seem overly emotional when it came to explaining the dissolve sequence however the more I saw it explained the more it made me appreciate all the thought that went into it. The way they explained all the meaning made me appreciate it more. Because the movie is moving quickly it’s easy to miss all the meaning in the images that dissolve quickly from the screen. So to answer the question the articles that I found didn’t necessarily extol the double dissolve as much as would give it due credit however the articles did make me appreciate them more and I feel that is how good articles should be written. To let the reader make their own opinions by giving the facts of things. Another tour de force montage that I noticed in North By Northwest in my opinion would have to be the car chase scene when Mr. Thornhill was drunk and driving because the views from all the cameras and how they kept switching back from outside and in between the cars to get the full effect amazed me.
    2. Another sequence besides the cornfield scene that struck me with the great construction was the scene in the forest on top of Mt. Rushmore and the climb down Mt. Rushmore. I chose this scene because it moved from a chase in the forest to the climb down the President’s faces and even then, it was switching back and forth from the good guys to the bad guys and it seemed like it would be extremely hard to choreograph and film that I had to pick it as the sophisticated sequence.

  11. Emily Buege Says:

    1. I think the double dissolve is justly celebrated. Filmmakers today use it and I think it keeps people watching. Without double dissolve, people would most likely get bored while watching a scene that could’ve been avoided if instead double dissolve had been used. Another example tour-de-force in North by Northwest occurs after Thornhill is mistaken for dead and put in a car. Then the car is driving away and it pulls up into this forest where Eve is waiting for him. It showed that little time passed because they were far enough in the woods they felt safe enough to see each other alone.
    2. Another sequence I found striking was the house and the plane sequence. I thought the house looked advanced for its time. How Roger had to climb through the complex bars to reach the doors where they were talking was also well done I thought. After Eve and Roger were escaping from the plane, they had no choice but to go down Mt. Rushmore. I didn’t expect the features on the mountain to look realistic.

  12. Samantha Miller Says:

    1. I thought North by Northwest was excellent. Before doing some research I didn’t understand why we were asked if a filmmaking technique was “justly celebrated”, it’s just a way to switch to a new scene, right? I certainly was wrong. After learning about the brilliance inside those 4 short shots, I saw the pure genius of Hitchcock throughout the whole movie. I do believe the double dissolve was justly celebrated. Many filmmakers nowadays use the dissolve method for transitions or to show time going by. There were a few montages in North by Northwest. The montage I enjoyed most began with the scene where Roger is waiting at the bus stop where he believes he will be meeting Kaplan. The camera would switch between shots of Roger waiting at the stop, carefully watching the horizon for a car that may have Kaplan inside, and different angles of the passing cars. This montage in particular was very suspenseful for me, as a viewer, because I was curious to find out who Roger would be meeting, knowing that Kaplan doesn’t actually exist.
    2. The cornfield scene certainly was complex and had a very modern feel to it due to the multiple switches in angles and perspective, the explosion, and the scenery. The scene on top of Mount Rushmore also struck me as complex. Mount Rushmore is a historical landmark so the replica set on which the final scenes were shot, had to be accurate. I’m sure the build for that set was no easy task. Also, the action didn’t just occur in one isolated area, it seemed to be spread out across a many different areas and was shot from various angles. What impressed me most was the camera positioning as Eve Kendall and Roger Thornhill were hanging off the mountain. The angles were a very effective way to emphasize the peril the two were in.

  13. Kyle Adams Says:

    1.I think the double dissolve in the North by Northwest was justly celebrated. The reason I think this is because for one it helps keep the pace in the movie interesting and it helps shorten the time it would normally take to get from one scene to another. I also think the double dissolve was justly celebrated because that kind of filming was new for its time. Another example of a tour-de-force montage is when Roger is helping Eve on Mount Rushmore and then the scene suddenly changes to where Roger and Eve are on a train they had talked about riding earlier.
    2.The cornfield scene was without a doubt, very complex. The reason being was because of its several camera angle switches from the airplane out on the horizon, to the road and the upcoming cars. Another sequence in the film that I found to be a sophisticated construction was the Mount Rushmore scene (when Roger and Eve are climbing down). The reason I chose this scene was because I thought it was very well done and the monument and surrounding scenery looked surprisingly realistic. For a movie that was made in 1959, the cinematography definately stood out during this part of the film.

  14. Ryan Kangas Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest was very justly celebrated. This technique is a fantastic way to present a lot of information that occurred over a long period of time to the viewers, in a non confusing way. The double dissolve also allows the director to change scenes and locations in a smooth way, that helps make the film seem to flow better. For example, when Mr. Townsend is killed a double dissolve is used to show him running away and then used to show that he is wanted for murder. This took very little time but advanced the plot a lot faster then showing each action by itself. A tour de force montage that I noticed was close to the end of the film where Roger pulls up Eve, the scene quickly changes to them on a train, and shows that they escaped un hurt and married each other.

    2. The cornfield scene was very complex and obviously deserves the praise that is gets, showing the plane pull off various stunts and then having an explosive ending that looked very real was very difficult to create even now. When this film came out it was amazing to the audience how real it looked. Another scene was also very complex but I don’t think quite as sophisticated was at the end at Mt. Rushmore. Even though the scene is clearly not taking place on the actual monument, it looks very realistic compared to other movies during that time and to audiences of the day it would have been amazing. I think that more work was put into that scene because of all of the props and sets that had to be made.

  15. Cody Carmona Says:

    1.The double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. The transitions in this time, I feel, were just being experimented with. No one had the technique down yet. But in this film, it was nicely done and it felt very modern. It helped make the passage of time no more than a few seconds. Alfred Hitchcock needed not to state when or where the new scene began. It just was. The audience knew that time had passed, whether it was a lot or little, and we were in a new time frame. It was truly brilliant. A great example of this tour-de-force montage would be the transition from Roger and Eve fleeing from the antagonists on Mt. Rushmore to Roger and Eve having a great time on in a cabin on a train. In this scene, Eve is dangling from the monument when Roger comes to the rescue and pulls Eve up onto…a bed? Clearly, there was no bed and nor was there a train with that bed in it on top of the monumental Mt Rushmore, but the transition was very smooth and it seemed natural for them to suddenly be in a train when a second ago they were hanging on for their life. Literally.

    2.The cornfield sequence is a very complex construction. Especially for that time period from which North By Northwest was made. Another sequence from the film that strikes me as a sophisticated construction is the scene where Roger is drunk and he is fleeing from his kidnappers. It shows Roger swerving, dodging cars, and drifting back in forth in the driver’s seat. I think this competes with the cornfield scene when it comes to complex construction and I was very impressed by this scene.

  16. Delaney Kapusta Says:

    1. The double dissolve is a nifty trick because it takes care of two things at once. It fluidly transitions into the next scene, but gives us a timeline so we are not confused. It especially came in handy with this movie because it changes the scenes while still maintaining the smoothness of the film.
    2. The scene that seemed the most sophisticated construction wise is the Mount Rushmore scene. scene. While is not the actual Mount Rushmore obviously, it was done with an amazing amount of accuracy, so you could not tell during the film.

  17. Josh Webb Says:

    1. The couple of instances in the film where there’s a double dissolve are examples of popular film techniques use most between the 1930s and 50s. The montages were used to put short scenes or shots together. The short shots were usually valuable information for the plot of the film that couldn’t have been really added to the dialogue of other major scenes. The other unique aspect of the montages was the variety of ways to transition to the next part or scene. The most popular transitions that were used at that time were fades, split screens, double and triple exposures, and dissolves. The person who used and came up with these transitions and special optic effects was usually not the director or editor of the movie. Another example of a tour-de-force montage was when Roger got off the bus in the middle of nowhere and waited for his contact. The camera shifts between views of the barren landscape to the speeding cars to the long road then back to him. Then more short clips are shown when Roger is avoiding the plane. The camera goes from the plane behind Roger to away in the distance to him running away.
    2. Another sequence that as a complicated construction in the film is the Mt. Rushmore sequence near the end of the film. It’s well constructed in my eyes because they obviously they couldn’t have filmed the entire sequence on the real monument because it would’ve been too risky and dangerous for the crew and the monument itself. Instead, they reconstructed the parts where the actors are climbing on and then they got a lot of distant shots of the real mountain. In some of the shots they show the actors from a distance climbing and hanging on to the monument, but what they did was lay a clear sheet with specs(of the actors) over the distant real shots of Mt. Rushmore. That’s one of the ways they used to do special effects.

  18. Jami Pekas Says:

    1. Yes I believe the double dissolve in North By Northwest was celebrated justly. Double dissolve is used to the audience that a significant amount of time had passed and in the film “North by Northwest” it does exactly that. I think it works justly because it keeps the flow of the movie going strong and also keeps the audience interested. By doing that also the time transitions don’t take as long as they would if they didn’t use double dissolve.

    2. There is another sequence in the film “North by Northwest” that I find as sophisticated construction as the cornfield sequence. That sequence is the Mount Rushmore sequence. I chose this scene because I just thought that it was very well put together and it was very realistic. They did not use the real Mount Rushmore in this film but they made a replica which I believed to be very sophisticated because it was made so well you could hardly tell the difference between the real and the fake one. You could really tell that they put a lot of hard work into this very tedious job of making this and it paid off. They also did all the acting on the fake mountains inside of just editing it in .

  19. Amanda Russo Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. The double dissolve shows time elapsing,without actually showing all the time that has passed. When Thornhill is forced to drink a glass of bourbon, the film dissolves to him fully intoxicated and about to be put into a car to drive to his death. The double dissolve shows that time passed, implying that Thornhill drank the bourbon and became drunk. Double dissolve shows the passing of time in a very concise manner. It keeps the flow of the movie and explains things that may not be shown in depth.

    2. Along with the cornfield sequence, there is a similar sequence with sophisticated construction. When Roger and Eve are being chased down Mount Rushmore, many things were happening at one time and it was obviously not able to be filmed on the real Mount Rushmore. The scene is very spread out with all of the different things going on, Eve and Roger running away, Vandamm and his cronies chasing them ,and people on the hunt for Vandamm. Also, the scenery looks so much like the real Mount Rushmore and when Vandamm falls off the mountain, it actually looks like he is falling, which I found very interesting for a film of its time to have effects like that. This was one of my favorite sequences due to the good effects, amazing scenery, and the constant action.

  20. Shelby Marsh Says:

    1) as I first started to do research on “double dissolved”, I didn’t really understand all the excitement about it, but then I realized how exciting it really is. It’s almost like time running over time, like elapsed time. I believe that double dissolve is justly celebrated, in the time of making this film. Hitchcock made it seem like such a smooth an easy transition of technology, and it made transitions a lot easier to understand. Another example of tour-de-force would be when Roger is in his car while drunk, and the camera flashes to the brush around him, and the things he almost hits, back to where he’s driving in the car.

    2) The cornfield scene, especially for this time period, was a scene with very complex construction. Although it was very urbane, I feel as though the Mt. Rushmore scene was a lot more eccentric. They way that Roger and Eve had to act as they were climbing down the side of the mountain. Mount Rushmore seemed so realistic to me, as did the corn field seen.

  21. Marc Snyder Says:

    1. The “Double Dissolve” technique in “North by Northwest” must have been justly celebrated because of how well it fits, and flows within the movie. The way that Alfred Hitchcock uses this technique is phenomenal, it’s a simple way to transition to a later scene and setting, while also easily telling the audience where and what had happened. It’s use in this movie gives the transitions an unparalleled feel, and doesn’t leave the audience asking questions. A tour-de-force montage that struck me personally, was in one of the last scenes when Roger and Eve were stuck almost falling to their death to Roger helping Eve up in the train. All this transition stated, was that everything turned out okay, and they were saved. All the points that Hitchcock wanted to get across.

    2. The cornfield scene in North by Northwest was complex, in it’s natural and full of suspense nature. But in my opinion, it didn’t compare to the Mount Rushmore scene near the end of the film. Obviously, Alfred couldn’t have the production on top of the real Mount. Rushmore, so he had to use what he had and make his own for that revolutionary sequence. This setting along with the reality of the acting, and dramatic actions, made this scene pop out more intensively, and sophisticated compared to the cornfield scene.

  22. Max Hazuda Says:

    1) The double dissolve is rightfully celebrated. This technique definitely gives the movie a sense of time passing and really lets the viewer assume and then find out what is happening. When Roger Thornhill is wrongfully accused of murdering a man, the double dissolve shows a lapse in time, in which Thornhill has become a wanted fugitive who must run from the police. This dissolve helps us realize that the entire United States is aware of the incident and that Thornhill has been fleeing the law. Another incident in which the dissolve technique is used is at the end of the film. Roger is attempting to life Eve so that she will not fall to her death and as he pulls her up the scene dissolves into a train cabin bed.
    2)Another part of the film that strike me as a complex construction would have to be the scene in which Roger and Eve are fleeing the house and Van Dam by climbing down Mt. Rushmore. This seems extremely complex considering you cannot stage such a large monument. I really think its amazing that Hitchcock made this part of the movie at the actual Mt. Rushmore in comparison to other films that stage parts of their movies.

  23. Jennifer Moor Says:

    1) Similar to others, I didn’t, at first, understand why the double dissolve technique was such a big deal. I mean it’s casually featured in films all the time, it’s very common. But then understanding the time period and the introduction of this technique, I would say it is justly celebrated. Using the double dissolve, numerous questions were answered at one time in such an efficient manner. We learned that Thornhill had been impersonating Kaplan, he had been wrongly accused of murder, and time had passed as well. All of this information seemed to be intricately, and realistically, “built-in” to the next portion of the story. It’s obviously a brilliant idea, hence why this technique is so commonly used in modern film. Another example of a tour-de-force montage in “North by Northwest” is the scene at the very end when they flip to the train. Moments before Roger and Eve had been hanging off the side of the cliff, grasping for their lives. Then, bam, they’re in a train. Clearly they survived and are now even married too. A lot of time had passed, but it was clearly portrayed in a simplistic scene.

    2) In my opinion, I feel that there are most definitely more sophisticated scenes besides the cornfield sequence. The monument scene struck me as pretty complex. Primarily, I thought the idea was creative; I never would have thought, “Oh lets just climb down Mt. Rushmore!” That was somewhat unexpected, and the execution of the sequence was very impressive. The set had to be created to mimic the monument, and then filmed from various angles. The film also cut back and forth between scenes with the ‘good guys’ (Roger and Eve) trying to escape and the ‘bad guys’ pursuing them while they are descending a sheer cliff. This sequence certainly appeared to have demanded more time and effort and creative thinking, all of which contributing to its sophistication.

  24. Ryan MacFarlane Says:

    1. The double dissolve is so celebrated in this film because it was the first nearly perfect use of it. The way Hitchcock used it to flow the story seamlessly into the next was unbelievable to me for how early the film was. It is still a widely used effect to this day. Another example of tour-de-force editing was the cut from roger pulling eve up from the side of the cliff, straight into him pulling her up to the bed with him.
    2. The cornfield sequence in itself, defined what we know as a suspense scene to this day, but it had to be the chase scene at Mount Rushmore that was the most complex. The alternating shots between Roger and Eve and their pursuers created a suspenseful sequence that could be place in a modern movie.

  25. Rebecca Rinell Says:

    1. I think that the double dissolve in North by Northwest is in fact justly celebrated. At first I didn’t even realize what was taking place, which is what makes it so brilliant. Instead of adding extra scenes and taking the attention away from the story, the dissolve into the scenes gives extra information that is needed to understand the story. It’s a discrete way of informing the viewers of what is going on in a short sequence of events and is very brilliant. There are a few examples where the change of scene shows information or shows a progression of time, but my favorite example is in the end of the movie. When Eve is falling from Mount Rushmore Roger is pulling her up and then all of a sudden the scene changes and instead Roger in pulling Eve up onto a bed on a train later in the story.

    2. The cornfield scene in North by Northwest is the most complex scene in this film, but the second most complex sequence in this film in my opinion would be the scene in which Eve and Roger are running from the bad guys and run from the airplane landing strip to the top of Mount Rushmore. It’s interesting how intricate the rocks are while they’re running down, although it looks a bit unrealistic. But for the technology used, it is very, very well done.

  26. Dale Main Says:

    1. The Double dissolve in “North By Northwest” is justly celebrated, because of the seamless way of showing us a time-line or time elapsed, and smoothly changing scenes. Alfred Hitchcock definitely did a great job with the double dissolve, because it was relatively new at that time. And people did not really know the proper way to do it without being shakey. Another reason that the double dissolve is so celebrated is because it really keeps the watcher interested the whole time. An example of the tour-de-force montage would be the scene where Roger and Eve are scaling Mount. Rushmore and they are holding on for dear life. Then suddenly Roger grabs Eve’s hands and pulls her on to a bed in a train, but another weird thing that happens is that he calls her Mrs. Thornhill. Which then you find out that they are married! That scene is a really great example of the smooth transition and quite surprising on how it turns out.

    2. The corn field sequence was definitely complex and sophisticated, which received praise from numerous critics. If you really think about how much would have went into building it. Its quite a tremendous feat. Though its not my favorite. The Mt. Rushmore scene was not actually film on the real monument. So the crew of “North by Northwest” had to reconstruct it. Which was made to look very realistic and the camera angles where great because they capture the action perfectly.

  27. Anthony Casciola Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in this film at first didn’t seem to have make a big difference on the plot of the film (that Roger was accused of murder in the newspaper). And the reason it didn’t seem to be a big deal is the exact reason that this technique was so successful. It is the simplicity that Hitchcock’s technique works so well because how it just flows with the scene and how a picture, only showed for a few seconds, has such a substantial amount of information in it. The other tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest that I saw was the scene where Roger and Eve were getting chased on Mount Rushmore. When Roger and Eve are reaching for each others hand at the most suspenseful scene of this movie, Hitchcock changes the scene to Roger pulling Eve up onto a bed calling her Mrs. Thornhill. This scene makes the viewer imply that they successfully got of Mount Rushmore and were now married. All of this comes from a change of a scene and a couple simple words.
    2. The cornfield sequence has been praised for a good reason, it is one of the most entertaining constructions in the movie. The way it makes us think that every car driving by is Vandamm, and as each car drives by it gives various reason why it could be him. Such as when the guy gets out of his car, is seems as if he is going to talk to Roger, however he was just waiting for the bus. Other reasons this scene is so complex is the way that Roger escaped from the situation. After hiding in the cornfield (and getting forced out), then trying to stop the truck (which the plane crashed into causing it to explode), making a scene where other cars stopped to see what happened, and finally Roger stealing one of those cars getting out of the set up situation. The other construction that was relatively as sophisticated was the Mount Rushmore scene. The reason this scene is so sophisticated is mainly the setting. The fact that it is not the real Mount Rushmore makes it more impressive because of how they made it look so much alike.

  28. Lauren Chapman Turner Says:

    1. The use of such a seamless transition known as a double dissolve in “North by Northwest” was an achievement widely acknowledged and respected in the film industry. The benefit of using the dissolve technique is that it provides a smooth transition from one setting to another, bringing the audience to a new place and a new time with new characters. This is done flawlessly in North by Northwest and as a result, it is justly celebrated. I think an additional example of a tour de force montage would be the final scene change of the movie. As Roger desperately holds out his hand for the love of his life, Eve, who is clutching to the side of Mt. Rushmore, he cries for her to reach out and take it. As she takes the reach the audience is left on the edge of their seat when suddenly Roger is pulling Eve onto a train bed. Calling her by the name of “Mrs. Thornhill” the audience is immediately informed of several facts simultaneously. For one, Eve and Roger survived the treacherous climb back to the top of Mt. Rushmore. Additionally, they have gotten married and are on a train traveling together. This transition is one of the more creative transitioning techniques and it proved successful in informing the audience of the newest change in scene.
    2. Another scene in the movie that displays a construction, in my opinion, as sophisticated if not more than that the of cornfield scene would be the scene that took place on the faces of our great presidents at the peak on Mt. Rushmore. This scene contains unbelievable camera angles that capture our characters at great heights, while switching between the protagonists and their enemies in a chase to the death. The entire scene gives the sense of suspense and danger while Roger and Eve dangle from the towering heights, completely entrapping the audience. It was an extraordinary scene that surpasses the complexities of the cornfield shot.

  29. James Alessandrelli Says:

    North by Northwest
    1) Doing some research online, the definition of a ‘dissolve’ is the gradual transition from one image to another. And a ‘double dissolve’ is doing this process twice in a row. An example of a double dissolve in North by Northwest is the scene when Roger Thornhill is running outside the United Nations building into a cab; which fades(dissolves) into a mirror that says on it ‘United State Intelligence Agency’ with the state capital building in the reflection; which then fades(dissolves) again to a newspaper in the hand of a man in a CIA conference room. While the double dissolve technique seems common in the modern time, but for the movie’s era this technique was advanced. One example of a tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest is the cornfield scene. In this scene the camera constantly switches from Roger Thornhill waiting at the bus stop, to a wide shot of the horizon, to the various cars and trucks going by, and back to him waiting at the bus stop. At the beginning of the montage he seems relaxed but anxiously awaiting the oncoming cars and is not concerned about the airplane in the distance. As the montage continues the tension builds with every nonstopping car zooming by, and the realization that the airplane is flying lower and closer with every pass.
    2) In the movie, North by Northwest there are a few sequences that have a sophisticated construction. Yes, there is the famous Mount Rushmore sequence. The one that striked me as one of the more interesting sequences are the opening credits. With hand drawn lines coming from first the upper right hand corner of the screen, then coming from the top and the bottom (half and half) of the screen to create a graph paper grid to hold the names of the credits. Then ending up being the outside of a tall building in New York City, and then having that building reflect the image of the busy streets down below.

  30. Jake McDuffie Says:

    1. I could definitely say that the double dissolve technique was very justly appreciated and celebrated from this film. The double dissolve really gave personality to the movie. It perfected the plot so that it could be easy to understand. It showed progression of time easier than other techniques may have. I distinctly remember another scene of tour-de-force in “North by Northwest.” Actually I can remember at least to but I’ll stick to one for times sake. The best example I saw in this movie would have to be when they stuff Cary Grant into the car and it fades out. The scene comes back from a time lapse and they’re in a distant forested area. It was a transition that didn’t make you think, “hey what happened?” The fact of the matter was that everyone could tell what was happening. This is exactly what needs to be achieved, leave the viewer with no questions when doing these time lapses. The impressive part (although my research shows that the technique is not as difficult as it may seem) is that the technique was used more than once in this film. I count at least 3, maybe more.
    2. I agree with the critics one-hundred percent on this one. The cornfield scene was a work of genius, the skill and precision needed to set up, use special effects, and have the actors perform accordingly are all very difficult to pull off. Another scene of the movie I would find to be complex is “the battle on Mount Rushmore” scene. Creating the sets to do such a feat of film-making magic is impressive in and of itself, but the bringing in actors and having a battle just brings out the difficulty, and skill of actors and cameramen. The cornfield scene was the most critically acclaimed, however I believe that other scenes, such as the Mt. Rushmore scene could have done just as well. Overall it was a film just filled with talented shots, special effects, and impressive director work. This has undoubtedly been one of my favorite films of the summer so far, I’m glad to have been introduced to such a great classic film.

  31. Taylor Carter Says:

    1. In my opinion, the double dissolve is, infact, justly celebrated. By using this technique, the film makers were able to cut certain scenes that, while pertaining to the movie itself, really had no point to the movie and had nothing to add to it. They were able to make more with what time they had. I believe that another example of tour-de-force montage was in the end of the film when the couple were being chased by the bad guys. It showed them make an escape to the car, but not the whole car ride, and then it showed them get out in the forest and make a run for it, but again, not the whole run. While it was part of the action, the film editors needed to keep the attention of the audience, so they chose the scenes that were most important and edited around them.
    2. The scene that, to me, seems more sophisticated in it’s filming would have to be the end fight scene. There are three different groups of people, all trying to make it down Mount Rushmore alive, one group fighting to stay alive and the two other fighting to get the statue back from them. Over the span of several minutes, we were able to see each group, both individually and as a whole climbing down this mountain. Several angles had to have been used to create this fight scene and as a result, fighting just this one part mustve taken quite a long time to complete. Had I been a critic of this film, I think that I would have praised this particular scene as sophisticated more so than the cornfield scene.

  32. Matthew Battles Says:

    1. Yes, this double dissolve is most definitely justly celebrated. The use of this technique conveys a large amount of information to the audience in mere seconds of filming. The process starts after the scene when Roger is framed for the murder of a diplomat at the UN, and then dissolves from a shot of the UN building into a shot of a company nameplate for what can be assumed is the CIA, although ‘Central’ cannot be seen in the sign. This nameplate is reflective, thus giving a view of the Capitol building. The nameplate shot then dissolves into the front page of the newspaper, implying that at least one day has passed since Roger’s being framed, and finally the scene changes to a meeting hall. The effect of this seemingly simple technique is an incredibly informative and smooth transition between two very different scenes. This creates an understanding of the meeting scene in the audience that requires no further explanation in the film. Another incredibly shot montage in this film can be seen just before the double dissolve in the scene where Roger enters the UN building. The scene is basically shown in montage form twice, back to back, the second time emphasizing Roger’s enemy. I believe this was used to convey a dramatic irony, in which we, the audience, know Roger is being followed while he himself is blissfully unaware.
    a. Yes, the scene towards the beginning of the film in which Roger is involved in a car chase is constructed in a sophisticated manner. The shot frequently transitions between Roger’s perspective, a third-person head-on viewpoint of his car, and his pursuers’ vehicle. During the shot of Roger’s perspective, the camera often veers over the edge of the cliff he is driving on, making it seem as though he is going to drive off of it, and thus adding another layer of suspense to the scene, on top of whether or not his enemies will catch him and what will happen if they do. This series of shots also gives the audience an intimate perspective, which allows the characters emotions to be understood very clearly, an aspect that is absent in many thrillers of its time.

  33. Andrea Ward Says:

    1. The double dissolve was a very smooth transition that could have easily been overlooked, but people appreciate a subtle change like this one. Therefore, I believe that it was justly celebrated. One of the challenges of making a film, or developing and presenting a story, is that all of the details must fit into a certain time limit. Filmmakers must focus on solutions for presenting information to the audience without wasting time. That said, the double dissolve was a very efficient transition.
    This film has a great ending for multiple reasons. The ending is not only clever and romantic, it’s a good tour de force montage. I like it, because it’s a sharp transition between two extremely different settings. The audience is put on their edge, hoping that Eve will be pulled to safety, then surprised with a delightful love-story success.
    2. Yes, there is. When Roger drives the car to the edge of the road, looking over a steep drop, the camera angle switches from an under-angle perspective of the wheel spinning, to an over-angle of the side of the car and the ocean below it. This technique makes the audience feel anxious for him to get back on the road, and get back to safety. This scene is sophisticated because of the effort it must take to make a situation seem reckless. The camera is focused on the road ahead as Roger drives, but the crew must be careful and diligent with the car and camera in order to keep the things rolling smoothly.

  34. Ryan O'Connell Says:

    1. A double dissolve is a gradual transition from one image to another, this allows for an easy way to express the passage of time without having to say the time has passed. Double dissolve is justly celebrated, due to the fact that it was impressive for the time the movie was made. One specific tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest that stuck out to me was, when Roger and Eve were hanging off the mountain and then were suddenly in the train all within the same scene.

    2. No doubt, the cornfield scene was a very complex part in the movie, due to all the camera angle changes. The scene that strikes me as a sophisticated construction, even more so than the cornfield scene, has to be the part when Rodger and Eve are climbing down Mt. Rushmore. This scene struck me as a truly incredible feat for the tools they had in 1959.

  35. Carlos Toribio Says:

    1. In my opine the double dissolve used in “North by Northwest” is justly celebrated since it helped made me feel like there was change and it showed very important information. In this film it didn’t say “Three years later.”, the film was very good at showing the transition without having to tell the audience.

    2. The mountain scene was very well designed. They were not allowed to film at the actual Mount Rushmore. So they built a replica, and they made it look very realistic. This scene was very believable.

  36. Samantha Dickson Says:

    1. The double dissolve is celebrated. An example of tour-de-force montage from North by Northwest would be when Roger gets put in the car and the car starts moving. The car end up in a forest where Eve is waiting.
    2. The mountain scene was well constructed and being well designed it stands out.

  37. Madison Stein Says:

    1. A double dissolve is a slow transition from one scene to the next. The double dissolve shows time passing on and on. The definition online says that- a dissolve is a gradual transition from one image to the next. I believe the double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. In my opinion, a good example of tour-de-force was ending scenes of the film, where the couple had to get away from the bad people chasing them

    2. I believe that the Mount Rushmore scene was a sophisticated construction. The whole scene is very thrilling and adds so much suspense to the viewer. The camera uses numerous angles that captures all the different characters. The built a replica of Mount Rushmore in this scene that could have fooled anyone. When I watched this movie i felt like I was escaping with Roger and Eve down the mountain. This scene was incredible.

  38. Allen Purmort Says:

    1. It seemed like a quite simple technique at first, however, the double dissolve used in “North by Northwest” really intrigued me the more I looked into it. what appeared as a sequence of meaningless visuals actually gave me vital information to better understand the plot. I definitely agree with the celebration of this technique in this instance, because had it not been implemented, Hitchcock would havehad to have used a change in both time and setting in an entirely different and less efficient manner. Another tour-de-force montage is with Roger and Eve on the train where he calls her Mrs. Thornhill, we can tell the time has passed.

    2. After seeing what must’ve gone into producing and filming the sequence at the cornfield, it was hard to see any sets that could possibly be more complicated. However, there were a few scenes that could come close to rivaling that particular scene. The sequence of the film that took place on Mount Rushmore was my second favorite, without a doubt. Replicating such a monumentous and recognizable landmark was a feat in and of itself, for if even one mistake was made, it would be noticed. The realistic falling scenes at the end really ended the movie well for me and was almost if not equally memorable to the cornfield in terms of visual excellence.

  39. Nicole Kuertz Says:

    1. believe that the double dissolve technique is justly celebrated. It iss the way of showing time passing without being too blunt or/and stating by adding captions no the bottom of the screen saying “such and such time has past.” I think an example of a tour- de- force montage in “North By Northwest” Is when Roger is helping Eve up from Mount Rushmore and it skips around to the point where he calls Eve by her name but adds in the fact that her last name has now change to his last name representing that they are now married. you know time has past because you do not see the scene of them getting married.

    2. Cornfield sequence has been praised by numerous critics for it is complex construction I think an other sequence shown in this film that strikes me as a very sophisticated construction is the scene on top of Mount Rushmore, to me it is one of the most complex scenes throughout the entire movie. The making up of that scene you know took a long time and hard work because it had to look the exact same as the actual Mount Rushmore.

  40. Nick Nolan Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated as an exceptional achievement. The double dissolve used in North by Northwest is after Thornhill is thought to have murdered Townsend the screen dissolves into a shot of Roger Thornhill running to a cab which dissolves to the United States Intelligence Agency headquarters and then dissolves into a shot of someone reading a newspaper saying Thornhill killed Townsend, who was a diplomat. Another example of a tour de force montage in North by Northwest is near the end when it goes from a shot of Thornhill and Eve reaching towards each other on Mt Rushmore then it dissolves and we find out she’s Mrs. Thornhill now.
    2. Another sequence in the film that strikes me as a sophisticated construction is at the end the fight scene that is supposed to take place on Mt Rushmore. The construction seemed very real but it was just a sophisticated set designed to look like the real Mt Rushmore.

  41. Megan Doherty Says:

    1.The double dissolve used in North by Northwest is definetley justly celebrated. Showing time passing in a very clear transition like that was new at the time and was a genius change up to transitions. It helped the story flow with ease and quicker than transitions used previous to this film, it was very creative. An example of tour-de-force montage in this film would be when Rodger was holding onto Eve as she was about to fall down Mt. Rushmore and then all the sudden they were in the same position Rodger pulling Eve up but instead he was pulling her onto a bed in a train calling her Mrs.Thornhill, showing time had passed to where they were married.

    2. A sequence in this film that seems to have a more sophisticated construction is the Mt. Rushmore scene. The set was really fantastic Mt. Rushmore seemed so real while the actors were fighting and climbing all over it. And the camera angles were really good too, it seems that this scene with set and filming and all would have been more complex deserving more praise in my opinion.

  42. Tyler Page Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique is an interesting film technique. It blends scenes together and can tell so much in such few frames. The double dissolve method eliminates the need for long arduous scenes and sequences that lets face can get tedious and redundant. Double dissolve liven things up and moves the story along. While it was used several times in the movie its real prowess was shown in the final scene where Eva was barely holding on to Thornhills hand; as he pulls her up she hops onto a bed with her now husband Mr. Thornhill. The transition was smooth and exquisitely natural.
    2. Though the cornfield scene is one for the books one particular scene in “North by Northwest” that struck me as unbelievably complex to build as well as shoot. The final scene in the movie, the climax where Eva and Thornhill are attempting to escape the clutches of Vanndamm by trying to scale down Mt. Rushmore itself. The walls constructed for the actors to climb on were very, very detailed masking the places to which the actors were to put their feet and hands. The engineers making it look awfully natural. Even the backgrounds although clearly blown up pictures had to be the right proportion with the people which was executed perfectly. Not only was there attention to detail but also the sequence involving the whole of the monument. The editing though primitive did show the massive size of the monument.

  43. santiago solano Says:

    1. the double dissolve is justly celebrated for sure. Although most people look back at that movie and do not see the innovation that the director of camera thought through in order to come up with a technique that would concentrate a several scenes into one that is understandable. another example inside this movie is when eva was was holding onto thornhills hand when she was about to fall down mt. rushmore and then she is in the same position but jumping onto the bed.

    2.another notable scene that seemed very complex was the fighting scene all around mt. rushmore. the set seemed very well detailed and it was all very believable. Although this may be overlooked, at the time it came out, it was incredible

  44. Josh Lopez Says:

    1. Once I started to research more and more about the double dissolve, I learned that it’s not just about one scene dissolving into another scene. In modern films it’s not uncommon to see the dissolving between two scenes. But besides just the change of scenes, these double dissolve scenes in North By Northwest tell a part of the plot in a more creative and quicker manner. The tour-de-force montage shows double dissolve when Roger is holding on to Eve at the end of the film when Eve is hanging off of Mt. Rushmore, and then Roger pulls her up and they are suddenly in a train and Roger is pulling Eve up onto the bed.

    2. Another complex structure that I noticed in this film was at the end of the movie when Roger and Eve are trying to get away from the people that kidnapped them. More specifically the scene when they are descending Mt. Rushmore. The camera angles and quick changes from shot to shot also would have made the structure of shooting this film very hard.

  45. Jordan Menke Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in the film “North by Northwest” is justly celebrated. It makes transition to the next scene very smooth and can pass long periods of time. Another example of tour-de-force montage is when Roger Thornhill is saving Eve from falling off Mt. Rushmore and then they are in the train which told the viewer that they had survived.
    2. The cornfield sequence has been praised by numerous critics for its complex construction but I believe the final scene on Mt. Rushmore was even more sophisticated than that one. The elaborate recreation of the mountain along with all the different views of the people was incredible.

  46. willyhernandez95 Says:

    1. I think that the double dissolve in this film is celebrated mostly because it has great use of it. The flow of the movie and how Hitchcock interpretted it was unbelievable. So all in all, it was indeed justly celebrated. A tour-de-force montage that struck me was when Roger got off the bus and waited for his contact. The camera shifts between views of the plain background and the speeding cars and then back to him. Then more short clips are shown when Roger is avoiding the plane.

    2. Another sequence that as a complicated construction in the film is the Mt. Rushmore sequence near the end of the film. It’s well constructed in my eyes because they didn’t have the privelege of fimling at the actual site, seeing as how complicated it would be. Instead, they reconstructed the parts where the actors are climbing on and then they got a lot of distant shots of the real mountain. The life size props and scenery really showed how far Hitchock went to produce this film.

  47. Austin Averett Says:

    1.The double dissolve technique was justly celebrated. The reason is, this technique was very new and was incredible for its time, this technique also saved a lot of time when switching from scene to scene and gave a cool effect to the viewer while doing so. Another example of tour-de-force is at the end of north by north west when Roger is pulling up Eve from falling to her death on mount Rushmore. The scene then changes to Roger pulling Eve up onto the bed in the train. This expresses the ending of the movie as a feeling of relief.

    2. Another scene other than the cornfield sequence that was sophisticated and incredible was the mount rush more chase scene. Where Eve and Roger are getting chased and have to climb on to mount Rushmore. This strikes me as sophisticated was because the mountain looked so real and the editing was really advanced for its time, especially when Vandamm falls off of the mountain. When Vandamm falls the editing in the film made it appear that he was actually falling instead of most movies that were made around the same time where the editing was not as sophisticated and you could tell there was editing done.

  48. Alexander Garcia Says:

    1. The scene when I saw it in the movie just seemed to be another transition between scenes. Now that it has been pointed out I realize that it was an ingenious way to showcase a different time and setting without going off topic. The setting takes us to the Whitehouse as seen in the reflection and time has passed as showcased in the newspaper which would take at least a day to create. A tour-de-force montage can also be found in the end where it shows him pulling her up from the monument and then the film has a mach cut where he is pulling her up on the bunk of a train.
    2. I believe the scene at the private house and airfield is just as complex due to all of the props in the house along with the tons of different shots in and around the house. A large part of the climax and falling action occurs in this area and that makes it complex similar to how all of the moving parts in the cornfield makes it complex.

  49. Megan Dawson Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique is quite genius when fully understood. It is not simply the transition between scenes by dissolving the image, but more a continuation of the scene in another setting. “North by Northwest” greatly displayed the use of the technique. For example, when Mr. Thornhill dissolves into the newspaper headline it signals to the viewer that time has elapsed. An example of tour-de-force montage that was most memorable was at the end when Roger was telling Eva to climb up then in the next instant he is pulling her up onto the bed on the train to New York.

    2. The corn field scene was definitely applaudable. The detail in creating the set to look like an actual cornfield was remarkable. The con stalks, the dirt road, and even the gravel looked believable enough to be real. One scene that struck me to have sophisticated construction was the monument and the filming done on the structure. The distance to the ground looked very realistic as well as the detail in the faces on the monument itself.

  50. William Dell Says:

    1. The double dissolve is highly praised, and rightfully so. Transitions back in the time of the release were not very effective, but Hitchcock found a way to make it work nicely. The transition had only lasted seconds but it effectively moved the story forward into its new frame. There was no need to say, in a subtitle, that time had elapsed. The transition was so smooth, the change in time was felt by all and done so naturally. I found it very cunning. I found the scene where Roger and Eve were on Mount Rushmore interesting. Eve was dangling and facing a 500 foot drop and certain death. Eve is holding on for dear life as Roger pulls her up on to the bed in a train. The transition was direct, straight from the thrilling scene over Mount Rushmore to the pull out bed of a train. The transition was very natural and it definitely worked in the movie. I enjoyed it and I’m sure many others would agree.

    2. The cornfield scene in this movie is very complex, even though the film is from 1959. I saw another sequence that was very advanced in construction. The scene is when Roger and Eve run down the runway to Mount Rushmore. I believe Hitchcock had to recreate the monument in order to film that scene. That setting with the realism of the acting made the scene amazing for its time and more sophisticated than the cornfield construction.

  51. Alex Ghalayini Says:

    1. I do believe that the double dissolve used in “North by Northwest” is justly celebrated. The double dissolve keeps scene by scene flowing nicely and keeping the storyline easy to follow. An example of tour-de-force montage is when Thronhill was thought to be dead and was put into a car. Eve is waiting for him in the forest, where the car pulls up to. Showing that a little amount of time had passed.
    2. The cornfield sequence had a very complex construction; however, there are other sequences that strike me as a sophisticated construction. Another scene that struck me as a sophisticated construction is the Mount Rushmore sequence. Although, they did not use the real Mt. Rushmore the replica was an exact match. This sequence was overall my favorite from all the special effects and the amount of time needed to put into the scene giving it it’s sophistication.

  52. Daniel Lefton Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in North by Northwest is certainly justly celebrated. It is a simple method that suggests a passage of time without having to include a ‘bumpy’ transition that often bores the audience. This strategy is still implemented in many films we watch today. Another example of a tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest is when Roger Thornhill is aiding Eve Kendall up Mt. Rushmore when suddenly it transitions into Roger Thornhill helping Eve Kendall into Train. This transition was incredibly smooth and suggested they were both safe and on there way.

    2. I believe the fight sequence on the top of Mt. Rushmore should be praised just as much as the cornfield sequence if not more. Both sequences required a lot of thought and outstanding intellect to pull off. Which they did! During the Mt. Rushmore sequence they took advantage of almost every camera angle and trick. The numerous angles really pulled off the effect of taking the audience into the battle with Roger and Eve. I cant even begin to image how difficult and how long this took. What really pulled off the scene though was the set. The set was incredible to say the least.

  53. Remy Phillips Says:

    1. The double dissolve in the North by Northwest movie was justly celebrated. It helps make the scenes blend together faster and reduce the overall time of the movie. Another tour-de-force montage is at the very end when Roger is trying to help Eve climb up Mount Rushmore and then the scene quickly transfers to Roger and Eve on a train.

    2. The cornfield scene has very complex construction. Another scene I think that has a complex construction is towards the end on Mount Rushmore. There were dozens of camera angles that were used on the Mountain. Also, the scenery was very realistic for being made in 1959

  54. David Kates Says:

    1.The double dissolve is definitely justly celebrated. It is a method of making a transition from one shot to another by briefly superimposing one image upon another and then allowing the first image to disappear. A dissolve is a stronger form of transition than a cut and indicates a distinct separation in action. It helps the scenes transition faster and smoother.
    2. The cornfield was amazingly detailed and complex. Another scene that struck me as amazing was the scene with Mt. Rushmore. Them battling scence on it was great.

  55. jack trefry Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique is jutly celebrated because it is a very usefull transition rather than a cut to another scene. For example the double dissolve technique can be seen at the very end of the film where eve is suspensfully hanging over the edge of mount rushmore when suddenly she is jokingly hanging off the bunk in the train. This example also shows how the technique can be used to show the lapse of time seen in the example above.

    2. Yes the other scene in this film that shows alot of construction in my opinion would be the scene where he is falsely accused of being Mr. Kaplan. I liked the construction of forcing him to drink alcohol and then planning his death as a drunk driving accident off the cliff.

  56. James Vesely Says:

    1. I do believe the double dissolve in North by Northwest was justly celebrated. It was great editing effect that was far beyond its time. The double dissolve really progressed the story in such away that the viewer really can tell Roger was in a lot of trouble. The two scenes were very different but the technique really brought them together in a great way. The two scenes were so seamlessly brought together that it really moved the story along greatly. Another example of a tour de force montage in North by Northwest is were Roger is forced to drive drunk down the hill side. It shows the scene from many perspectives. At one part in this scene it shows the road through Roger’s eyes and it looks really cool with the two images he sees coming to one.

    2.Another scene that I think is a sophisticated construction is the fight scene on Mt. Rushmore. The set was very well put together and I thought the action sequence was very exciting. The part when Eve is hanging off the edge of the cliff the camera angle was used very effectively. You can see the valley in the background far below and that really adds to the suspense. Then when he pulls Eve up it jump cuts to the scene where Roger pulls her up to the bunk on the train. It skipped forward past their wedding and made the viewer realize they got out of trouble and had a happy ending. This was a very revolutionary scene and and was a great way to end the movie.

  57. Sydney Dukas Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in North by Northwest was highly praised, as it should by, since it created another great film element that makes movies so powerful today. The double dissolve helps to create flow in a movie and helps to distinguish facts that are key to the plot without actually blatantly stating the fact like in North by Northwest when they flashed the headlines of the news paper which helped you discover that Townsend was now a criminal and being tracked by police. Another brilliant technique used in the film was the way they were able to use green screen of some sort to display the street behind them and in front of them as the were inside a taxi or a normal car. All though it may not be as realistic as some of the things we have today, it still showed movement of the car and probably created a new tool to use I the film industry.
    2.I thought another great scene in the film was when they were on top of Mt. Rushmore and having the whole chase scene. It created a lot of drama and suspense and was well crafted and creative to shoot it on top of a faux Mt. Rushmore. Also the scene in which Eve was hanging on to mountain, reaching for Townsend’s hand created much suspense and when he was finally able to pull her up onto the rock, they used it as a clever way to switch to a scene on the train where her is pulling her up on to the bed. That whole scene was genius and probably very innovative for it’s time.

  58. Morgan Lawrence Says:

    1. The use of double dissolve helped to smoothly transition the movie all the way through. The revolutionary use of this in film helps the audience to visually grasp the context and pertinence of two scenes being meshed together and creates a deeper meaning to the viewer. I have seen this used to to illustrate the drama or melancholy of a character’s life in the movie. I have seen a lot of this in a movie called, “The Virgin Suicides” where the perspective is all from the neighbor boys and they constantly day dream about the girls and being with them.
    2. I felt as though the crop duster scene was sophisticated. Not only because it has a very simple suspense origin and had little use of props. Another thing that made this different was the lack of music in the scene, even though there was no music, however, you still felt the suspense of the scene due to the close ups of the actor’s face as hes running and hiding for his life.

  59. Ariel Mandelblum Says:

    1.) The double dissolve used in North by Northwest utilizes the ability to allow scenes to flow fluently with one another and makes the movie more enjoyable to watch from the audience. Is this technique justly celebrated….I’d say so, yes. When this is done properly, it can lead to a scene or sequence of scenes to work together, but if done by the hands of a novice, it can lead to confusion in a scene and destroying a buildup that would have be achieved if done properly.

    2.) The cornfield sequence well deserves the praise that critics have awarded it, besides that another scene that I think that possesses a level of sophisticated construction would be at the end of the movie where they are located at Mt. Rushmore. I think that this strikes myself as a “sophisticated construction” because of all the multiple camera angles that took place during this one scene gave the feel of a near 360 degree outlook on what was happening.

  60. Celeste Says:

    1. The double dissolve scene in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. Alfred Hitchcock was not only able to update the audience on three crucial points in the story line, but is able to do so in a revolutionary and entertaining way. The first shot, a striking over head shot of the UN building, has the “United States Central Intelligence Agency” plaque transparently morphed on top of this shot. Then, the plaque become untransparent, showing a reflection of the Capitol Building, then becoming transparent and the background is replaced by a news paper showing a picture of Thornhill running, which is the faded in completely, becoming the new scene: a conference room in the CIA building. This single scene reveals four things: the location of the new scene, that time has passed between the murder and now, that Robert Roger Thornhill is the suspect, and that he has yet to be captured. Another tour-de-force in North by Northwest is when Roger saves Eve dangling from the Mount Rushmore monument and then pulling her up into a bunker bed on the train.

    2. The cornfield scene is rightfully praised. While I think the complex and impressive construction of this scene out shines that of any other scene, the scene that has the second most sophisticated construction would have to be the second to last scene, on the Mount Rushmore monument. Because Hitchcock, obviously, couldn’t film this scene on the real monument, constructing an accurate replica was quite involved. The set was able to capture that overwhelming size and height of the monument, which added suspenseful and dramatic elements to the scene.

  61. Marcus Martell Says:

    1. Alfred Hitchcock deserves all the praise he had received from North by Northwest because of his revolutionary technique of double dissolve. He opens his film with credits on a grid like screen and soon turning those grids into windows of a building. He perfected this technique throughout the film, making the film more suspenseful and enjoyable.

    2.The corn field scene deserves all the praise that it received. It had excellent shots, and created suspense with not music, but the sound of the plane and cars going by. Another scene that was sophisticatedly put together is the Mt.Rushmore scene. The set design was very realistic, and thus added a lot of suspense to the scene.

  62. Kayli Eslinger Says:

    1. In “North by Northwest” there is a editing concept that is shown multiple times, known as the double dissolve. The movie is praised for this technique as it was shown as being very popular around the time and is now used in movies today. I would say the double dissolve is justly celebrated. The example that websites give of this concept includes the scene in which Thornhill is shown in the UN building being accused of a murder to switching to an overview of the building and Thornhill appearing to be the size of an ant running to a taxi and getting inside, then transitioning to a meeting with the CIA about this murder incident. Another very recognizable example of this tour-de-forge montage is at the very end of the movie when Thornhill is on Mount Rushmore reaching for Eve’s hand and then transitioning to a scene where he is doing the same movement in a bedroom on a train. This montage is very noticeable because it reveals that time has passed and that the two “love birds” survived Mount Rushmore.

    2. Although the cornfield scene did not seem very complex to me, it is apparently known for being complex. Aside from popular demand, I would say I found the car chase scene to be very complex. The editing in this scene was phenomenal because Hitchcock made it appear that Thornhill was actually intoxicated while driving as he switched back and forth from a picture of Thornhill to Thornhill’s point of view. Also, the way in which Hitchcock made it seem like Thornhill was actually driving with a moving projection of cars and trees behind Thornhill when the camera was pointed at him. The realism in the scene is what made it appear to have a sophisticated construction.

  63. Elena Correa Says:

    1. The double dissolve feature used in North by Northwest is acclaimed to be very useful and entertaining, thanks to Alfred Hitchcock. The use of the double dissolve creates a more comfortable feel for viewers so they can see a transition from scene to scene more smoothly. It allows two or more scenes to work together to create a well sequenced plot. Another tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest is shown when Roger saves Eve from Mt. Rushmore, followed by the scene in the train, telling the audience of their survival after having time pass.

    2. In addition to the cornfield scene, another complicated part in North by Northwest is the Mt. Rushmore scene. Because of it’s difficult structure and build, it must have been a very sophisticated construction. The set seemed to be very realistic and quite large in size. Along with the large set build, the camera angles were also very complex.

  64. Alison Gollnick Says:

    1. I think that the double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated. The dissolve effect is when one image is laid over another and a gradual transformation occurs by dissolving one image into another. The double dissolve in North by Northwest was very cleverly applied. By deciding to use the double dissolve technique, Hitchcock lets the audience know the very setting and time period of the film in a few quick dissolved images. When looked at closely, these images have much more importance than just establishing the setting. The images actually stand for a much more metaphorical meaning. Another example of tour-de-force montage used in the movie happens during the Mount Rushmore scene. As Roger and Eve are climbing Mount Rushmore Eve reaches for Roger’s hand and the scene quickly cuts to the two of them on a train. This cut allows for a huge time gap to be covered and jumped in a matter of seconds.

    2. I agree with the critics saying that the cornfield sequence was definitely the most complexly structured scene of the movie. Another sophisticatedly structured scene in this film is also the aforementioned Mount Rushmore scene. The way that Hitchcock structure and applied the scene was so ingenious to me.

  65. Delilah Rogers Says:

    1. i believe that the double dissolve is justly celebrated. The double dissolve in this film, North By Northwest, is cleverly used to cut a large cap in time while also revealing that thornhill has been identified and has managed to escape capture, these three things were clearly shown through three separate images dissolved into each other one by one. Another dissolve that was used in North by Northwest was when Roger lifted Eve onto the mountain and as he was lifting her, the scene transitioned to them on the train laying together.

    2. I found the Mount Rushmore scene to be the most complex throughout the the movie because of the many diverse camera angles that were used and the realistic scenery. The camera angles were very creative and skilled because many of the shots were looking down on the characters from above, many others were looking up at them, and the. There were also many close ups, wide shots, and side angles. Besides the amount of angles there were in the scene, there were also a lot of cuts to other shots to get the action of the other characters.

  66. Matias Macias Says:

    1. I believe that the double dissolve in this film is justly celebrated because it is impressive for the time period it was made in. It allows for a smooth transition that explicitly states the amount of time passed, without overcomplicating things, making the plot a lot simpler to understand. It also takes out several unnecessary scenes so the length of the film can be short and more audience-friendly. I would say that another example of tour de force montage in this film would be when Roger reaches out to grab Eve’s hand when she is hanging off the side of Mt. Rushmore, and than a transition occurs where the audience sees him pulling her onto a train bed. This sort of transition leaves the audience in suspense and than allows for great engagement of the audience.

    2. Another sequence in this film that strikes me as a sophisticated construction is the running scene on Mt. Rushmore with Roger and Eve. The visuals for this scene is incredible for its time, and the editing makes the monument appear very realistic.

  67. Russell Savary Says:

    1.The double dissolve used in North by Northwest allows for a great series in the film as the audience is able to keep tabs on three different things at once through the conescutive dissolving of images. This makes for an amazing instance and is truly deserving of the acclaim it has received over the years.
    2. The first scene in the film that tracks Thornhill leading a crowd is somewhat significant as it is a difficult shot to direct and sets the scene for the character’s popularity that is expanded upon in the film.

  68. Malia Fushikoshi Says:

    1. After looking into the double dissolve technique used in “North by Northwest” I believe it is justly celebrated. There are many benefits of using the techniques. One is that the visuals give the audience a better understanding of the plot. Also, the method transitions time to go by in a smooth way without captions. An example of a tour-de-force montage in “North By Northwest” is Roger lifting up the love of his life, Eve, from Mount Rushmore and as the suspense is riding the scene goes into Roger lifting up Eve onto a train bed, which the characters talked about riding the train earlier.

    2. The cornfield scene is praised correctly and I believe the complex and impressive construction of this scene definitely is the best scene. The next scene with the most sophisticated construction would have to be the sequence that took place on Mount Rushmore. It had to be very hard to replicate Mount Rushmore, any tiny mistake would be noticeable by critics. In the film, the construction was realistic and the Mount Rushmore in the film looked like the real Mount Rushmore.

  69. Sabrina Geannopulos Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated because it was something that was never really seen before in films. The technique helps keep the movie going even if the its skipping time. Another example of tour-de-force Eve and Roger are climbing Mt. Rushmore and they’re both near falling off and then they grab hold of each others hands and suddenly they’re nearing a bed while on a train and Roger is calling Eve Mrs. Thrornhill which is a great way to elapse a long period of time yet keep the moving going.
    2. Another sequence in the film that strikes me as sophisticated construction was the last scene at Mt. Rushmore. Obviously the monument was not the real one so to have to recreate the entire thing in an early time period is incredible. Also the switching back and forth between characters during the action was very impressive and you could tell how long it took to make the sene so precise. It’s a scene that should be praised just as much as the cornfield scene!

  70. Cole Thomas Says:

    1. A tour-de-force montage in North by Northwest would be in the particularly famous drunk-driving scene. Thornhill got significantly drunk and was put behind the wheel of a Mercedes, where he then went on a dangerous escapade. There are a few scenes where he nearly hits cars, missing by only a few inches. There’s also a shot where he was about to drive off the side of a cliff, but somehow managed to get out of that situation. Eventually the police catch on to his drunk driving and go after him showcase in a brief car chase scene that ended abruptly when he crashed.

    2. I found the scene where Thornhill is chased on Mount Rushmore to be particularly well constructed. He was leaping over dangerous rocks with Eve, and they both knew about the possibility they could both fall to their demise. I think the fear of both the characters really helped the scene itself. While the construction looked spot on, the characters really played out the events. When Eve was about to fall off the cliff, it made for one of the most intense scenes in the movie, which is why I think the construction of Mt. Rushmore played a large role.

  71. Justin Conti Says:

    1. The double dissolve is a nifty trick because it takes care of two things at once. It fluidly transitions into the next scene, but gives us a timeline so we are not confused. It especially came in handy with this movie because it changes the scenes while still maintaining the smoothness of the film. Another great transition is when Eve is being lifted from the side of Mt. Rushmore and it transitions into her being helped off of the train.
    2. Prior to the great transition scene, they are running in the forest on top of Mt. Rushmore and the climb down Mt. Rushmore. I chose this scene because it moved from a chase in the forest to the climb down the President’s faces and even then, it was switching back and forth from the good guys to the bad guys and it seemed like it would take a lot of work to do these transitions back and forth with some of the camera shots.

  72. Haley Huminski Says:

    1.) While researching the double dissolve in “North by Northwest” online, I have come to the conclusion that it is definitely justly celebrated. At first, I didn’t think much of the technique until I really thought about its importance. The double dissolve technique really helps each scene transition into the next scene smoothly, and it helps the audience be prepared as to what the setting of the next scene will be. Another example of tour-de-force montage in the film, “North by Northwest”, was during the last few sequences when Eve was nearly an inch away from falling off the side of Mt. Rushmore and Roger was reaching his hand out to try and pull her back up. Suddenly the scene jumps to Eve and Roger lying in a bed on a train. This sudden location change filled in for a period of time that would have shown that they had both survived.

    2.) I understand why the famous cornfield sequence in “North by Northwest” has been praised by numerous critics for its complex construction. The graphics were very well detailed, the different camera angles kept me interested and the shot of the train exploding looked so realistic. With that being said, I did find another sequence in the film that also caught my attention as a sophisticated construction. Towards the end of the film, the shots of Eve and Roger climbing Mt. Rushmore also looked so real. It was a great idea to add in real footage of mountains in the background so the audience would fall into an illusion that we were actually watching real footage of Eve and Roger climbing in such a dangerous situation.

  73. Nicholas Dynin Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique used in North by Northwest is justly celebrated due to its ability to tell crucial points of a story in just a few transitional shots, giving the director the chance to use the saved time to further the story. An example of a double dissolve is the one after the assassination of Townsend. Hitchcock displays an extreme wideshot of Thornhill at the foot of the United Nations building, which transitions into the nameplate of the Central Intelligence Agency. The nameplate itself reflects the capitol building that stands across the Central Intelligence Agency, letting the audience know that the space has changed from New York to Washington. The dissolve transition continues, fading out the nameplate shot and leading the audience to the shot of a Newspaper held by a person in the CIA, which shows that Thornhill is on the run, and that not only the space has changed, but significant time has passed as well.

    2. The cornfield scene was praised for its realistic appearance, with the airplanes looming presence sprouting goosebumps on any viewer of the film. Its complexity was lauded highly, with the multiple angles constantly keeping the audience engaged in the standoff. The finale, with the truck exploding, was remarkable as well because of the credible nature of the scene construction. Another example of such credible complexity is the finale on Mt. Rushmore. The replica was extremely believable to say the least, and the various angles of the struggles experienced on this set were absolutely breathtaking. Hitchcock’s ability to pull off something so complex with ease is the reason why so many of his movies, including North by Northwest, are hailed as cornerstones of cinema.

  74. syros95 Says:

    ALINA SYROS

    1. I was surprised as to what the double dissolve vision technique really was. Although it seems meaningless at first glance, it actually helps the audience perceive what is going on in the film and causes a natural flow. It’s so recognized because it hadn’t been seen much before this film. An example is Eve being lifted onto Mount Rushmore and then suddenly she is being escorted off the train. It can be a bit confusing though and cause a film viewer to believe things are taking place that were really just the other half of the double dissolve tactic.

    2. Another incredible scene from this movie is when they are trying to escape from their kidnappers as they run down Rushmore and the cameras follow them from excellent angles creating a terrific shot. I belive this was probably the most noteworthy scene from the film.

  75. Brett McCabe Says:

    1. It seemed like that the double dissolved scene is celebrated in this film. The double dissolve scene is used to pass a significant amount of time in the film without keeping the audience confused. This film technique is used perfectly at the end when Roger grabs Eve’s hand at Mt. Rushmore, and then the scene switches to Roger helping Eve on the train. Viewers can know from this switch that Roger and Eve made it safely to New York.

    2. The cornfield scene is praised for its complex construction. Another scene in this film that has complex construction is the Mt. Rushmore scene at the end. The multiple camera shots and the music make this scene have more suspense and drama until the very end. This scene in my opinion, has more complex construction than the cornfield scene.

  76. Nicolas Lopez Says:

    1. The double dissolve in film is a very interesting technique. It helps the film transition from scene to scene. Before this film it wasn’t ever used much. It helps tell the story of the film in a smother and better way. It helps to keep multiple images in your head at the same time as one thing dissolves into the next.

    2. The cornfield scene is a very complex scene due to its realistic appearance. The Mt. Rushmore scene is also another example of a complex scene in this film. With all the angles make it an amazing scene. This scene in my opinion is one of the most stunning and amazing scenes throughout the whole fill due to the different shots and music.

  77. Corey Carr Says:

    1. The double dissolve may not have seemed like an extremely big deal when watching the film, but after research it is apparent that it is a truly genius move by Hitchcock. It provides a transition in which change of time and setting are smoothly and interestingly progressed. The shot on Mt Rushmore with Eve nearly following transitioning to safety is a good example of tour-de-force.
    2. Another complex scene is the aforementioned Mt Rushmore scene. The angles and sounds throughout the action our definitely breathtaking and suspenseful, making this one of the best scenes of the film.

  78. Samantha Weinmann-Smith Says:

    1. When first watching the film North by North West I didn’t even notice the double dissolve, probably because it is seen so much in modern films. However after researching it I realized how genus it truly was. I think it was justly celebrated because it was a great way to show that time had passed without interrupting the story line. One great example of this is when it shows the newspaper heading after Thornhill was framed for stabbing the man at the united nations. Another example of “Tour-de-force” is when he is driving drunk and the camera goes back and forth between him and and what he is seeing.
    2.One scene that struck me as complex was when the police were chasing Thornhill, because the shot went back and forth between the police and Thornhill. I also liked how the viewer could see the police coming before Thornhill could, because it made the viewer question if he would get caught.

  79. Melina Simunovic Says:

    1. The double dissolve surprised me because I didn’t even realize it when I first watched, but after researching it I looked back and noticed how important it really was in the film. It allows the film’s storyline to continue without interruption. Another great example is when Eve is close to falling off the edge of Mt. Rushmore and suddenly her and Roger are safe on the train.
    2. Another scene that appeared to be sophisticated to me was when Roger was drunk driving and the point of view continuously went back and fourth between his vision while driving and what was actually happening.

  80. Collin Gauntlett Says:

    1. The double dissolve technique is used very effectively in North by Northwest. This technique allows the audience to absorb multiple ideas at once. We seem to find this technique to be used a lot more in our more modern films. This was an astounding technique at the time since it allows for smoother transitions and keeps the audience on pace for what is going on in the film. One example of tour-de-force was the fight on Mount Rushmore looking as if they were falling the entire time. Although it was just the camera that made it appear this way.

    2. There is another sequence that is incorporated into this film that strikes me as a sophisticated construction. This sequence takes place with the ruckus on Mount Rushmore. During this scene the different angle shots add to the suspense of the fight.

  81. Max Mulholland Says:

    1. The double dissolve is justly celebrated in North By Northwest, it is complimentary to smoother tranistions and keeps the story easy and effective to be followed.
    2. The fight scene atop Mt. Rushmore was accompanied with sophisticated construction.

  82. Jarrett Hogan Says:

    1. In “North by Northwest”, i believe the double dissolve is justly celebrated. The double dissolve allows for a nice transition from one time period to another without breaking the plot. For the time period it was created in, it was very advanced thanks to Alfred Hitchcock and his genius. Although we see it so much more in modern films, this technique was extremely advanced from the time period it was introduced and is a very useful tool in the film industry.

    2. Another sequence in the film besides the cornfield sequence that was sophisticated construction was the battle on Mt. Rushmore. I think it’s sophisticated because it recreated the whole mountain and there were such difficult and demanding shots that were produced.

  83. Taylor Buchanan Says:

    1. The double dissolve in North by Northwest is justly celebrated because it was something that was never really seen before in films. There are many benefits of using these techniques. The technique helps keep the movie going even if the movie its skipping time. This film changes scenes a lot and with the help of double dissolving, the film transitioned smoothly.
    2. The cornfield scene is a very complex scene due to its realistic appearance. Another sequence in the film besides the cornfield sequence that was sophisticated construction was the battle on Mt. Rushmore. This scene recreated the whole mountain and there were such difficult and demanding shots that were produced with the help of angles and sound.

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